Beiträge

Call for Papers for our second CyberFactory#1 Workshop at the ESM2021!

Call for Papers to be presented at the 35th European Simulation and Modelling Conference

October 27 – October 29, 2021, Rome, Italy

2. Workshop: CyberFactory – Optimization & Resilience of Factories of the Future

This workshop focuses on the development and application of methods for modeling and simulation of CPS for the factory of the future (FoF). With the advent of Industry 4.0, digitalization and automation processes have moved into the focus of industry. The primary goal is not the optimization of a single production plant, but of the factory as a whole by the marriage of physical assets and advanced digital technologies, such as the internet of things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and robots. From a modeling perspective, the individual components of the factory thus become cyber-physical systems (CPS) that communicate, analyze, and act upon information, enabling more flexible and responsive production. This track focuses on the development and application of methods for modeling and simulation of CPS for the factory of the future (FoF).

The organizers invite contributions with a focus towards CPS in the FoF that describe problem statements, trends, and emerging ideas in the engineering and application of CPS in industrial production.


Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Requirements on CPS modeling for optimization and resilience of the FoF
  • Architectures for the FoF
  • Application of existing CPS models to industry: benefits and gaps
  • Usage of digital twins for optimization and resilience in the FoF
  • Data lake exploitation for the FoF
  • Models & Simulations for the identification of threats on safety and security in the FoF
  • Tool support for modeling & simulation of the FoF
  • Uncertainties and predictions in the FoF models
  • Modeling of human-machine-interaction in the FoF
  • Distributed manufacturing
  • Cyber resilience modeling for the FoF

Paper format:

Participants may submit a 5 page full paper or an 8 page extended paper (single spaced, double column) in PDF format. Paper formatting guidelines and templates can be found at https://www.eurosis.org/conf/esm/2021/submissions.html. All accepted papers will be published in the ESM’2020 Conference Proceedings.


Workshop format:

The workshop will be held as part of the European Simulation and Modeling Conference (ESM) 2021 to take place in Rome, Italy on October 27-29, 2021. It will feature peer-reviewed paper presentations organized according to the topics defined above. Papers not exceeding 8 pages must be submitted electronically via email in PDF format and must be conform to the submission guidelines.

Each submission will be reviewed by at least three members of the Program Committee and will be evaluated on the basis of originality, importance of contribution, soundness, evaluation, quality of presentation and appropriate comparison to related work. The program committee as a whole will make final decisions about which submissions to accept for presentation at the conference.


Important Dates:

Paper Submission deadline:                           Jun 25th, 2021
Notification of acceptance/rejection:      Aug 21th, 2021
Camera ready paper:                                          Sep 27th, 2021
Workshop:                                                                Oct 27th-29th, 2021


Organizers:

Adrien Bécue (Airbus Cybersecurity)
Frank Oppenheimer (OFFIS e.V.)
Ilhan Kaya (Vestel)
Ingo Stierand (OFFIS e.V.)
Isabel Praça (Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto)
Jarno Salonen (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd)
Linda Feeken (OFFIS e.V.)

Contact:
Linda Feeken, linda.feeken@offis.de

LISA wird neuer Projektpartner von CyberFactory#1

 

Wir freuen uns über einen neuen Partner im CyberFactory#1-Konsortium: Seit Februar 2021 ist LISA Deutschland GmbH bei den deutschen Projektpartnern dabei. Die LISA Gruppe ist ein international bekanntes Unternehmen für intelligente Systeme und machinelles Lernen und verfügt über umfangreiche Erfahrung in der Entwicklung von Systemen für den Luft- und Raumfahrtbetrieb.

Im Rahmen des Projekts wird LISA einen autonomen Anomalie-Bot zur Verfügung stellen, der Cybersecurity-Anomalien erkennen soll, um die Produktion und Fertigung in der Fabrik der Zukunft zu verbessern. Der Bot wird innerhalb der Anwendungsfälle von Airbus Defense and Space (Spanien) eingesetzt, kann aber zur Erkennung von Cybersicherheitsanomalien in jeder Umgebung verwendet werden. Mehr über den Beitrag zum Projekt können Sie hier lesen.

 

Are there hidden costs of untrusted technology in 5G private networks?

In some European metropolitan areas, you can already see a 5G symbol on your mobile phone display. Nevertheless, most networks are still in the planning phase and mobile network operators (MNOs for short) have not yet made a final decision on which equipment provider they will purchase the network technology from. This applies even more to private corporate networks, so-called campus networks, despite the decision being potentially significant for the security of the factory of the future.

In many European countries, there are currently discussions about the economic possibilities in connection with the new mobile communications standard 5G. This concerns possible leaps in productivity, but also the security gaps and dependencies associated with greater networking that would arise if these new mobile networks were built with Chinese technology, for example. As a result of these discussions, some states have excluded untrusted network equipment suppliers from building domestic 5G networks or set the regulatory hurdles so high that the result is tantamount to a ban.  The question which is slowly moving up the agenda is: is it necessary to also regulate private networks with respect to the technology they use? From the perspective of an economist this should only be the case if using untrusted technology has a detrimental effect on customers, suppliers or employees for which they are not compensated. Economist call that negative externalities.

Network equipment providers for 5G networks are expected to have a high level of trustworthiness in order to participate in an infrastructure that controls large parts of a factory of the future. It is particularly difficult for Chinese suppliers to establish this credibility. They are often seen as untrustworthy, operating from a country without sufficient rule of law, which exercises strict state control over their business conduct and management. Moreover, Western intelligence agencies, cybersecurity firms and the media regularly report that China is the country of origin for numerous attempts at industrial espionage.

If companies with such origins are nevertheless involved in the deployment of 5G networks in Europe, this will come at a significant cost. Only part of these costs are incurred by the company operating the network and choosing the network providers. A large part of the costs must be borne by other parts of society, which in absence of further regulation have no influence on the choice of network provider.

Even when the factory of the future decides which providers to procure 5G network technology from, they do not take all costs into account – either because they are hidden costs that will be incurred later (life-cycle costs) or because they are borne by others than the MNOs (external costs). Of course, many security-related costs will also occur if 5G networks are built exclusively with trusted technology. However, these costs will be lower because a trusted provider is a cooperating partner in securing the network from external influences.

If non-trusted providers are a part of a private 5G network, additional efforts will have to be made

  • to test and verify the software updates provided.
  • to share information with other private network operators, government agencies responsible for network security, and with suppliers and customers of the cyber factory of the future. New information sharing and analysis centers need to be established among industry participants.
  • to build additional sensors into the network to monitor network traffic and detect unintended data flows to third parties.
  • To develop and integrate new AI tools into network management as an early warning system for covert data exfiltration.
  • to devote resources to enforce regulatory policies and compliance to compensate for the lack of trust in the network.
  • to cover damages caused by cyber-attacks by spending (more) money on cyber insurance to deal with the financial consequences.

If a 5G network contains untrusted technology, more of the burden to protect data or machines controlled over the network falls on the operator, but potentially also on other parts of their value chain. The latter will have to spend more resources on classic cybersecurity tools or will have to leave the value chain that makes the cyber-factory of the future and thus will not be able to realize potential productivity gains.

European 5G technology providers will have a hard time competing with companies that do not need to make a profit in order to stay in the 5G business – for example because they are backed by a state for strategic reasons. To internalize the external costs and to guarantee a level playing field, it should be considered to not only regulate nationwide networks, but to include private 5G campus networks. The goal is to either exclude non-trusted technology or to require operators of campus networks to invest in the necessary additional protection when using non-trusted technology.

Authors: Johannes Rieckmann und Tim Stuchtey, BIGS

A more detailed description and estimate of the hidden costs of untrusted vendors in 5G networks can be found in the policy paper and the country studies for Germany, France, Italy and Portugal. The virtual presentation of the policy paper takes place on the 16th of March at 2pm (CET).

Virtuelles Panel – CyberFactory: How to make the Factory of the Future efficient and secure?

Am 9. Dezember fand unser virtuelles Panel zum Thema “CyberFactory#1: How to make the factory of the future efficient and secure” statt. Unsere Referenten, Adrien Bécue, İrem Hilavin und Jari Partanen, stellten das Projekt, den Anwendungsfall Vestel und Aspekte der FoF- Resilienz vor. Dann folgte eine Dikussionsrunde und Fragen unter anderem zu den Beziehungen von Mensch und Maschine oder zu den Möglichkeiten die dieses Projekt Unternehmen, die nicht direkt beteiligt sind, bieten kann. Unten finden Sie die Präsentationsfolien. Wir freuen uns auf viele weitere Veranstaltungen im neuen Jahr!

 

 

Zusammenfassung:

As factories digitalise and adopt automation technologies, they unlock new business models, manufacturing processes and logistics methods – as well as alternative roles for the people and machines that work in the factory. At the same time, these processes result in more complex IT and OT systems, presenting novel cyber security challenges and potentially leading to dangerous new interdependencies.

Based on early results from the European research project CyberFactory#1, our panel will discuss both the opportunities and challenges represented by the digitalisation and automation of factories, including what the transition towards a new factory system of systems may look like – but also the new threats that organisations may face if security and resilience are not prioritised early in the process.

 

Sprecher:

Adrien Bécue, Project Leader CyberFactory#1, Head of Innovation, Airbus CyberSecurity, France

Jari Partanen, Task Leader CyberResilience, Head of Quality, Environment and Technology Management, Bittium, Finland

İrem Hilavin, Work Package Leader Integration & Validation, SW Design Architect, Vestel, Turkey

 

Towards Digital Twins for Optimizing the Factory of the Future

Abstract

Logistics are essential regarding the efficiency of factories, and therefore their optimization increases productivity. This paper presents an approach and an initial implementation for optimizing a fleet of automated transport vehicles, which transports products between machines in the factory of the future. The approach exploits a digital twin derived from a model of the factory representing the artifacts and information flow required to build a valid digital twin. It can be executed faster than real-time in order to assess different configurations, before the best-fitting choice is applied to the real factory. The paper also gives an outlook on how the digital twin will be extended in order to use it for additional optimization aspects and to improve resilience of the transport fleet against anomalies.

Access to Document (upon request)

Link

Authors

Patrick Eschemann, Phillip Borchers, Linda Feeken, Ingo Stierand, Jan Zernickel & Martin Neumann

Paper Presentation at ISAmI 2020

Prof. Dr. Isabel Praça of the School of Engineering (ISEP) / Polytechnic Institute of Porto (IPP) will present a paper titled: “FullExpression – Using transfer learning in the classification of human emotions” at ISAmI 2020 – the International Symposium on Ambient Intelligence – later in October this year.

The paper addresses the topic of how emotions can be detected to pave the way for mental states like fatigue, lack of attention, or similar symptoms detection. This is ISEP background research with the intention to apply it to the capabilities of Human Machine optimization and safety capabilities of CyberFactory.

CF#1 is now part of EFFRA portal

CyberFactory#1 is now listed as a project on the European Factories of the Future Research Association (EFFRA) innovation portal. It is for now the only ITEA project that is part of the portal.

You can find more information here: https://portal.effra.eu/projects.

We are delighted to be in the company among these others ambitious and innovative projects!

Call for Papers: Workshop on Cyber-Physical System Modeling

Workshop on Cyber-Physical System Modeling: Applications for Industry 4.0 Optimization and Resilience – Call for Papers

In conjunction with ESM 2020, October 21 – October 23, 2020, Toulouse, France

This workshop focuses on the development and application of methods for modeling and simulation of CPS for the factory of the future (FoF).

With the advent of Smart Factory, digitalization and automation processes have moved into the focus of industry. The primary goal is not the optimization of a single production plant, but of the factory as a whole by augmenting physical assets with advanced digital technologies, such as the internet of things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and robots. From a modeling perspective, the individual components of the factory thus become cyber-physical systems (CPS) that communicate, analyze, and act upon information, enabling more flexible and responsive production.

The organizers invite contributions with a focus towards CPS in the FoF that describe problem statements, trends, and emerging ideas in the engineering and application of CPS in industrial production.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Requirements on CPS modeling for optimization and resilience of the FoF
  • Architectures for the FoF
  • Application of existing CPS models to manufacturing: benefits and gaps
  • Usage of digital twins for optimization and resilience in the FoF
  • Data lake exploitation for the FoF
  • Models & Simulations for the identification of threats on safety and security in the FoF
  • Tool support for modeling and simulation of the FoF
  • Uncertainties and predictions in the FoF models
  • Modeling of human-machine-interaction in the FoF
  • Distributed manufacturing
  • Cyber resilience modeling for the FoF

Paper format:

Participants may submit a 5-8 page full paper (single spaced, double column) in PDF format. Paper formatting guidelines can be found at https://www.eurosis.org/conf/esm/2020/submissions.html. All accepted papers will be published in the ESM’2020 Conference Proceedings.

Workshop format:

The workshop will be held as part of the European Simulation and Modelling Conference (ESM) 2020 to take place in Toulouse, France on October 20-23, 2020. It will feature peer-reviewed paper presentations organized according to the topics defined above. Papers not exceeding 8 pages must be submitted electronically via email (see: https://www.eurosis.org/conf/esm/2020/email-reply.html) in PDF format and must be conform to the submission guidelines (see: https://www.eurosis.org/conf/esm/2020/submissions.html).

The IEEE transaction templates can be used to get a suitable layout (see: https://journals.ieeeauthorcenter.ieee.org/create-your-ieee-journal-article/authoring-tools-and-templates/ieee-article-templates/templates-for-transactions/).

Each submission will be reviewed by at least three members of the Program Committee and will be evaluated on the basis of originality, importance of contribution, soundness, evaluation, quality of presentation and appropriate comparison to related work. The program committee as a whole will make final decisions about which submissions to accept for presentation at the conference.

Important Dates:

Paper Submission deadline: Jun 25th, 2020

Notification of acceptance/rejection: Aug 25th, 2020

Camera ready paper: Sep 30th, 2020

Workshop: Oct 21th-23th, 2020*

Organizers:

Linda Feeken (OFFIS e.V.), Eva Catarina Gomes Maia (Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto),  Frank Oppenheimer (OFFIS e.V.), Isabel Praça (Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto), Ingo Stierand (OFFIS e.V.)

Contact:

Linda Feeken, linda.feeken@offis.de

Conference website: https://www.eurosis.org/conf/esm/2020

 

*programme of the ESM is not yet fixed, workshop will be on one of the three conference days

 

Finnish Consortium with First Steps towards Improved FoF Security

When developing Factories of the Future, security is also an important aspect. CyberFactory#1 will respond to this challenge by developing a set of safety and security capabilities. One of these capabilities is cyber resilience. Although the development work has not yet started, CyberFactory#1’s Finnish partners prepared and presented a Cyber Resilience Starting Point Demo in the project review at Oulu in January.

Figure 1 A part o fthe demo set-up

Resilient communications

A key resilience function in FoF systems, including IIoT, is the ability to maintain constant connectivity to industrial control systems and other systems on a continuous basis. A single network may not provide sufficient reliability in critical manufacturin  g systems. Therefore, in order to build resilient manufacturing systems, a seamless network failover is relevant. The scenario in Figure 2 demonstrates IIoT device network switching for resilient communications.

Figure 2 Demo scenario 

Continuously up-to-date IIoT devices

A common flaw in IIoT systems is the cumbersome or non-existent update management system. Administrator needs to be provided with insight on the current rate of deployment of up-to-date and outdated devices, and with capability to monitor the update progress in real-time, using the device management console dashboards. The scenario in Figure 3 demonstrates the use of standards based device management (LWM2M) and the standard mechanism for updating IIoT gateway remotely.

Figure 3 Demo scenario for standards based device management and remote updates

Dynamic reconfiguration of IIoT devices

Dynamic security policies in IIoT devices are an important enabler for resilience of IIoT systems. Based on IIoT device produced data (and changes in certain data points) the security policy of the IIoT device gets updated from the device management server. This scenario demonstrated how dynamic reconfiguration enables the recovery from incidents and disaster situations.

The demo was created in collaboration with Bittium, Netox, VTT and Rugged Tooling, using the knowledge of each partner to create a realistic environment. “It was great to able to contribute to creating the traffic needed, and test our sensor in the mutually created environment”, says Esa from Rugged Tooling. “Bittium SafeMove® Analytics was adapted to the demo in order to demonstrate the fleet of the IIoT devices, in order to detect the devices and required updates for cyber resilient operations. We were also able to connect the system seamlessly and wirelessly with the cloud connectivity provided by Netox”” clarified Björn from Bittium.

This Starting Point Demo was a great collaboration effort and a remarkable first step towards the Kick-off of Work Package 5: FoF dynamic risk management and resilience in April 2020.

Involved Partners: Bittium, Netox, Rugged Tooling, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

The Use-Cases of CyberFactory#1

The key problem addressed by CyberFactory#1 is the need to conciliate the optimization of the supply and manufacturing chain of the Factory of the Future (analyzed by means of Use-Cases) with the need for security, safety and resilience against cyber and cyber-physical threats (analyzed by means of Misuse-Cases).

Therefore, in order to study this key problem, ten pilots have been developed from Aerospace, Automotive, Machinery and Electronic Industries around several use-cases (UC). These UC were then described and matched with Key Capabilities defined by CyberFactory#1 project proposal plan (technical value chain items):

UC1. Airbus Defense & Space (Spain):

At Airbus three sub-use cases are defined for the deployment of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) for flexible management and optimization of manufacturing as well assembly lines within the Aerospace Industry.

  • UC1.1 Description – Roboshave (Tablada Site): Connectivity of the Roboshave station to the IIoT to improve traceability, supervision and maintenance of the processes.
  • UC1.2 Description – Autoclave (CBC Site): Real-time monitoring and quality process automation across the IIoT for the process of composite parts curing and forming within Autoclaves area.
  • UC1.3 Description – Gap Gun (San Pablo Sur Site): Automation of the data acquisition using a Gap Gun device (smart tool for gaps and steps measuring) with a centralized data storage and the possibility for further data analysis.
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UC2. S21Sec (Spain):

This UC addresses Human/Machine collaboration in manufacturing for quality control.

  • UC Description: The evolution of TRIMEK’s METROLAB solution, which focuses on quality control laboratory services towards a Zero Defect, through its integration with fully automated processes within the auxiliary automotive industry (controlling environmental variables and interconnecting the shop-floor). This means an overall enhancement of Metrolab Scenario (incorporation of several cybersecurity tools/services, including of Cobots)

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UC3. Bittium (Finland):

This UC is concerned with a cyber-secure networked supply chain and information architecture.

  • UC Description: The goal is to create a consistent and secure information architecture and develop processes as well as information tools, which are able to support digital partnered manufacturing and deliveries, in order to achieve supply chain optimization.

UC4. High Metal (Finland):

This UC will develop a highly automated food production line of the future (in this particular case for cheese making).

  • UC Description: The High Metal UC introduces a new integrated platform-based concept for cheese manufacturing that enables: better flexibility for product quality changes, scalability for production increases, shorter installation as well as production start-up time and better efficiency and easier maintenance compared to traditional dairy production lines.

UC5. IDEPA (Portugal):

This UC will digitalize a textile production line (legacy machines) for the automotive industry.

  • UC Description: The goal is to increase efficiency (and also security, safety and resilience) focusing on the development of a new generation of ERP tools, considering Security Awareness and providing Data & Knowledge as a service. This should be achieved along with IDEPA business transformation (connectivity of legacy machines).

UC6. VESTEL (Turkey):

This UC is concerned with the optimization of material handling in PCB assembly lines.

  • UC Description: The objective is to pass from conventional material handling managed by operators and without data gathered from machines (no traceability) to a new situation oriented to the integration of machines in the electronic board assembly line with ERP system, warehouse and carrier robots in order to achieve optimization of the production and improving the traceability, and also considering cybersecurity aspects.

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UC7. Bombardier Transporter (Germany):

This UC aims to optimize the material supply for the rail vehicle production.

  • UC Description: The main objective of this UC is the optimization of material supply for railway vehicle production by building an automatic supply system from the warehouse directly to the workstations, in order to have a safe and automated provision of the material within its various physical levels (many different customer projects are carried out in parallel at the Bautzen Plant in Germany).

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UC8. InSystems (Germany):

This UC addresses the optimization of an autonomous transport robot fleet (ProANT).

  • UC Description: This UC is focused on the collection of data from normal operations of a transport robot fleet that can be used for detecting individual patterns via ML and predictive systems. This information can be also used for logistics optimization, and in a dynamical way for adaptation to continuous changes.

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What is the general purpose of the use cases with the project of CyberFactory#1?

These use cases are contributing to the creation of the Factory of the Future (FoF) concept, which is the key goal of the Cyberfactory#1 project. The main objectives addressed by the different use cases developments, that may help to create this FoF concept, can be summarized as the following ones:

  • Automation of E2E processes across M2B & B2M communications.
  • Real time (or near real time) situational awareness and factory systems monitoring.
  • Enhanced visibility and traceability of the activity within the Factory.
  • Optimization and secure communications for Supply Chain (Distributed Manufacturing).
  • Advanced data analytics and Machine Learning for processes improvement.
  • Connectivity and integration of the Factory systems (Factory as a System of Systems).
  • Communications security and global security management.

Author: José Antonio Rivero Martinez, Automation for Industrial Means, Industrial Means Dpt. – Manufacturing Engineering, Airbus Defence and Space

PS: If you are interested in more depth in one or more of the UC(s), we are happy to get you in touch with the relevant UC owner(s). Please use for all inquiries the following email address: info@cyberfactory-1.org.